Take a Gander

The Medieval Power Cards

  (Don't worry. Those corners will be nice and rounded. We don't want anyone to put an eye out.)

(Don't worry. Those corners will be nice and rounded. We don't want anyone to put an eye out.)

There are 27 powers in Medieval, and each one gets a "power card." Some powers are just a single province, others sprawl across multiple provinces on the map--like the Holy Roman Empire. (Which was neither Holy, Roman, or an Empire, if you're down with Voltaire.)

In Medieval, your cabal begins with a handful of powers over which you have influence. From there, it's up to you to battle, claw, and scheme across the game map for more. Or, you can play nice and lose. It's totally your call.

ukraine-kramer.jpg

Sorry, there's no card for Ukraine.

But let's take a look at the aforementioned Holy Roman Empire and break down the info on its card. That'll give us an example of what's on the card and how it drives a fun night of backstabbing around the table.

  HGN legal insists we make a disclaimer that this is preview art too. Who are we to argue?

HGN legal insists we make a disclaimer that this is preview art too. Who are we to argue?

Working top to bottom, we see:

  • Name of the power (or province) and its relative strength, with 4 being best.
  • Its dominant religion -- Catholic, Eastern Orthodox (both Greek and Russian), Islam, or Pagan.
  • Army strength (a combat roll bonus), followed by navy strength (also a combat roll bonus).
  • Number of Florins gained by the player who first gets control of the power.
  • Ruler rating at the start of the game, which you apply to land battles, Crusades, and civil wars. (Rulers have a rating of anywhere between -1 and +1, so if your lousy -1 ruler gets poisoned, feel free to celebrate.)
  • A visualization of the provinces and the map areas that make up the power.
  • Income each of its provinces provides.

We're also designing the event cards, like the Pope, assassinations, disasters, and everyone's favorite, the Mongols. And the box cover is coming along, too. Look for that real soon.

From a look and functionality standpoint, we asked our graphic artist, Blackwell, for a few thoughts:

How do I get you to feel like you’re playing a game of influence in the 14th century, but still convey information in a modern and clean manner? I grabbed graphical elements that felt aged, as well as some easily triggered visual cues such as illuminated manuscripts to overlay, and then set about arranging my elements. Elements like stamped metal bars and period iconography like the Florin became the standards. Everything had to read cleanly and easily though, so there was no art for art’s sake on the cards. Everything has its clean-cut space and defined boarders.

We hope you dig it.

Have you seen the map yet? If not, bounce over to the Get Medieval page or tap on the map below for a closer look at it and the game overall.

If you want the inside line on when Medieval hits Kickstarter, sign up on our home page or the Get Medieval page. Either one will do you right.

- Novice Peter

#getMEDIEVAL!

Pete Gade