Smite thy Neighbor

The Joys of Attacking in Medieval

If you ever made your 12-year-old cousin cry while playing Risk, this blog post is for you.

A cornerstone of gameplay in Medieval is attacking your neighbor, because neighbors have what you want: cash and influence. By attacking and defeating other provinces, you gain the revenue that they generate and the victory points that they bank at the end of the game.

 Our usual disclaimer: that's playtest art and components you're looking at ...

Our usual disclaimer: that's playtest art and components you're looking at ...

Combat goes pretty much like you'd expect in the 13th Century--you trace a path from your attacking power to the province you're targeting. Not next to the player in the lead who really, really needs to be attacked right now? No problem. Strike a deal with another player so that you can trace an attack through their territory, which is sweet because we hate people in the lead. They deserve what's coming to them.

In Medieval, you chuck a d6 for combat, as does your opponent. High roll wins, with ties going to the defender. But before that, there are some mods to your dice roll, like if the ruler of your attacking power is superior or poor, and further mods if you choose to drop some extra coin on mercenaries.

 Our artist, Beth Sobel, isn't spending any Florins for combat--or Caine snatched the pebble from her hand.

Our artist, Beth Sobel, isn't spending any Florins for combat--or Caine snatched the pebble from her hand.

Mercs work like this: every three Florins you spend gets you a +1 on your roll (or every 2 Florins if you're an Islamic power that has played a Jihad card). But be aware, an opponent defending a controlled province can spend money on mercs too. That's why Florins are allocated in secret before the battle dice get tossed--unless you have a Spy card that forces your opponents to reveal how many mercs they're bringing to the party.

And sure, you can go after uncontrolled provinces too. Just be ready for the table to erupt into chatter about who has the hottest dice, because invariably that person will get selected to roll for the neutral defense roll. (That's how the Georgians go down in Medieval history for fending off six consecutive attacks. Not that I'm speaking from experience or anything.)

So, that's a quick look at combat. Got a topic you want us to write about? Drop a line on our Facebook page.

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#getMEDIEVAL!

- Novice Peter

Pete GadeRay's Pizza